07 10 / 2013

Well, not officially. Maybe it is somewhere, I don’t know.

Who cares? Every day is dictionary day for OED researcher Jon Danzinger, whose job I might want and with whom I would definitely have a drink, although I have never met him. All of this is based on this profile about his job in which he adores librarians who obviously adore him too.

It is also eternally etymological for Emily Brewster, associate editor at Merriam-Webster, who argues in this video that “liberry” may be acceptable pronunciation caused by dissimilation. I admit I like the theory of descriptivism better than the practice: understanding why something happens does not make it any less annoying. I don’t really want her job, but may still enjoy a hypothetical drink with Ms. Brewster and her absolutely perfect teeth.

08 5 / 2013

SPARC on the Savannah careytoane GoAnimate

Nerd alert: I made this video for my last mini-teaching session of the Instructional Skills Workshop at Western tomorrow. I wonder if my fellow teachers/students will want to know more about the SPARC Author Addendum (the dialogue here was all cribbed and modified from that link) or about making GoAnimate videos? Maybe I’ll give them a choice. 

11 4 / 2013

The Bridge’s Saga Noren explains in seven frames why charging for library books is stupid - and yet not worth killing anyone over, either.

28 1 / 2013

My friend Adam Seelig emailed me in December:

Dear Carey,

How the hell are you?! Ken Sparling has entrusted me with one of his gorgeous one-off collage-like books that’s part of his “serial library” that can only be distributed person-to-person, à la Frank O’Hara “personism” (as Frank put it: “I confess that it may be the death of literature as we know it”!). I would love to relay it to you. Interested?

Oh, and no surprise: the writing, Ken’s, is brilliant!

Cheers,
AS

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I couldn’t resist an invitation combining two of my favourite things – libraries and book binding – so Adam and I met on Dundas Street West on a snowy night to make the hand off. It’s nice to see friends bearing books.

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Them Damn Jalopy is a one-of-a-kind, handmade/modified collage book and novel by the one-of-a-kind Toronto author Ken Sparling. A librarian by day, Ken has created a private library of these books, which he has named the Serial Library.

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As I am wont to do with library books (I spend a lot on TPL fees, okay?), I took my time opening it up. And when I did I saw this:

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…and this:

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The story is confessional and heartbreaking, featuring Sparling himself and a cast of characters including children Mark and Deve, lovers Femur and Septum, God, Pillow, and someone named Lance. The text is laid out in a bewildering array of fonts that could give a graphic designer a stress migraine, but here works to add to the effect of a chorus of voices. 

The found illustrations are carefully chosen and inserted on ragged-edge pages of variable size, creating the effect of a scrapbook of artifacts, a case file, a cabinet of wonders. Sparling has preserved elements of the original book, including the dust jacket which he’s cannily flipped over. I was reminded of Anne Carson’s Nox more than once – and the fact that TDJ is unique makes me like it even more.

The sad thing about library books is that you have to return them, eventually. Or in this case, I’m going to pass it on to a friend. When I’m done.

17 12 / 2012

Just in time for Xmas!

29 11 / 2012

Just to prove my previous point…

(Source: badwolfoswin, via hellogiggles)

29 11 / 2012

I might try this at my next interview.

28 11 / 2012

In which I confess my long-standing case of reporter’s database envy, compare myself to Veruca Salt, and resist skipping through a candyland of information.

15 10 / 2012

The following is cribbed direct from an email from the event organizers: 
"October 22 marks the start of Open Access week at York University and around the world. In the spirit of this celebration, we’ve assembled a panel of speakers to debate the value of emerging forms of scholarly communication. Can we change scholarship? Must we? Has the blog arrived, or does the book remain king? Join us on Monday, October 22 at 1 pm in the Scott Library Atrium or follow #blogvsbook to decide: Should the blog replace the book?Arguing for the Blog:Ian Milligan is an assistant professor of history at the University of Waterloo. He is a founding co-editor of the blog ActiveHistory.ca and, ironically given his debating stance here, is working on a book manuscript dealing with young workers, unions, and New Leftists during the 1960s in Canada.Melonie Fullick is completing a PhD in Education with a focus on post-secondary governance, policy, and organizational change. She holds a BA in Communication Studies from McMaster University and an MA in Linguistics from York University. Melonie has written for various publications including Inside Higher Ed, the Guardian UK, University Affairs, and Academic Matters, and she can be found on Twitter at @qui_oui and through her blog, Speculative Diction.Arguing for the Book:John Fink is the Digital Scholarship Librarian at McMaster University. He completed his BA in English from Miami University in 1995, and his MLS from San Jose State University in 2005. His research interests include copyright, open source software, physical computing, version control, and the digital humanities.Scott McLaren completed his PhD in Book History and Print Culture at the University of Toronto in 2010. He is Humanities Librarian and a faculty member in the Graduate Program in Humanities at York University. This year, Scott was awarded a Botein Fellowship in Book History by the American Antiquarian Society in Worcester, Massachusetts. His research has appeared in a variety of scholarly journals including the Papers of the Bibliographical Society in Canada, Renascence, and Christianity and Literature.”

The following is cribbed direct from an email from the event organizers:

"October 22 marks the start of Open Access week at York University and around the world.

In the spirit of this celebration, we’ve assembled a panel of speakers to debate the value of emerging forms of scholarly communication. Can we change scholarship? Must we? Has the blog arrived, or does the book remain king?

Join us on Monday, October 22 at 1 pm in the Scott Library Atrium or follow #blogvsbook to decide: Should the blog replace the book?

Arguing for the Blog:

Ian Milligan is an assistant professor of history at the University of Waterloo. He is a founding co-editor of the blog ActiveHistory.ca and, ironically given his debating stance here, is working on a book manuscript dealing with young workers, unions, and New Leftists during the 1960s in Canada.

Melonie Fullick is completing a PhD in Education with a focus on post-secondary governance, policy, and organizational change. She holds a BA in Communication Studies from McMaster University and an MA in Linguistics from York University. Melonie has written for various publications including Inside Higher Ed, the Guardian UK, University Affairs, and Academic Matters, and she can be found on Twitter at @qui_oui and through her blog, Speculative Diction.

Arguing for the Book:

John Fink is the Digital Scholarship Librarian at McMaster University. He completed his BA in English from Miami University in 1995, and his MLS from San Jose State University in 2005. His research interests include copyright, open source software, physical computing, version control, and the digital humanities.

Scott McLaren completed his PhD in Book History and Print Culture at the University of Toronto in 2010. He is Humanities Librarian and a faculty member in the Graduate Program in Humanities at York University. This year, Scott was awarded a Botein Fellowship in Book History by the American Antiquarian Society in Worcester, Massachusetts. His research has appeared in a variety of scholarly journals including the Papers of the Bibliographical Society in Canada, Renascence, and Christianity and Literature.”

09 9 / 2012